Akovos

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Akovos
Άκοβος
Akovos is located in Greece
Akovos
Akovos
Coordinates: 37°11′N 22°10′E / 37.183°N 22.167°E / 37.183; 22.167Coordinates: 37°11′N 22°10′E / 37.183°N 22.167°E / 37.183; 22.167
Country Greece
Administrative region Peloponnese
Regional unit Arcadia
Municipality Megalopoli
Municipal unit Falaisia
Highest elevation 883 m (2,897 ft)
Community[1]
 • Population 202 (2011)
Time zone EET (UTC+2)
 • Summer (DST) EEST (UTC+3)
Postal code 22021[2]
Area code(s) 3027910[2]

Akovos (Greek: Άκοβος) is a mountain village and a community in the municipal unit of Falaisia, southwestern Arcadia, Greece.[2] It is situated in the foothills of the Taygetus mountains.[3]

Its nearest villages are Dyrrachio and Leptini.[2] It is 4 km west of Dyrrachio, 4 km northeast of Poliani (Messenia), 15 km south of Leontari and 23 km south of Megalopoli. In 2001 its population was 182 for the village, and 202 for the community, including the village Goupata.

History[edit]

The name of the town is derived from the Latin word for water, for the many sources of water in the area.[3][4] During the medieval period, the village was named Akova or Matagrifon, and it had a castle there.[5] Ruins from the late Roman, early Christian, and Byzantine periods are found a few kilometers west of Akovos.[3]

The barony of Akova was established during the distribution of lands of the Byzantine Empire, which happened after the conquest of Constantinople during the Fourth Crusade (1202-1204). It was one of twelve baronies established within the Arcadia area of the Peloponnese region.[4][6] In 1209, the barony was given to Gautier[4] or Walter of Rosières,[7] a Medieval French knight who participated in the Fourth Crusade. He was the first lord of the Barony of Akova that was then in the Frankish Greece Principality of Achaea. According to the Chronicle of the Morea, Rosières built the fortress of Avoka. The Franks began to called it the castle of Mattegrifon, which meant expel or kill the Greeks. A Walter of Rosières died childless about 1273.[4][7]

Walter's heir was Margaret of Passavant, his sister's daughter by John of Nully, Baron of Passavant. Margaret had been held hostage in Constantinople to the Byzantine court since 1262, and when she tried to claim the barony, it had been confiscated by Prince William of Villehardouin, since her claim was forfeited under Achaean feudal law. She had not claimed it within 2 years and 2 days of Walter's death. Margaret married the influential John of Saint Omer to promote her claims and pursued the matter in a parliament held at Glarentsa about 1276. The parliament found in favor of the prince, but he ceded a third of the barony (8 fiefs) to Margaret and John. He kept the rest of the property and fortress of Akova, which became a fief of William's youngest daughter, Margaret.[4][8] Margaret became the second Lady of Akova in 1277. She gave the land to her daughter, Isabella, and her husband Ferdinand of Majorca.[4][9] The Battle of Manolada over ownership of the barony ensued in 1316, and it went to Louis of Burgundy. Then in 1320, Akova along with the castles of Karytaina, Polyphengos, and Saint George in Skorta, fell to the Byzantines under Andronikos Asen.[10][11] In 1391,[4] or 1395,[12] Evrenos Bey had the castle.[4]

The area was inhabited again in the 15th-century,[3] and "the castle town" of Avoka was then destroyed by Mohammed II in mid-1458.[3][13] There is evidence among the ruins that Metamorphosis, St. George, and St. Demetrius churches existed there during the Byzantine era.[3]

Pierre Peytier, Kololotronis and his personal escort

Theodoros Kolokotronis married and settled for several years in Akovos. In 1825, he fought a battle nearby in the village of Drampala against Ibrahim Pasha. While waiting in Akovos for Ibrahim's forces, Kolokotronis vowed with the villagers that he would build a larger church and he carved his initials into a stone of the Agia Sotira church. The anniversary of the battle is celebrated by the town on the day of the Pentecost. As of 2008, his home is the village's Cultural Centre.[3]

Overview[edit]

In keeping with its name for water, the village has a number of water fountains, one of which is more notable that the others and is named Neraidovrysi.[3]

Akobos panorama.jpg

Population[edit]

Year Population village Population community
1981 283[2] -
1991 293[2] -
2001 246 264
2011 182 202

Goupata[edit]

Part of the Akovos community,[14] Goupata is a small settlement of less than 50 people near the village of Kamara and the Kato Gianei settlement.[15] It is about 5.2 kilometres (5,200 m) north of the center of Akovos.[16]

Religion[edit]

One of the churches in Akovos is Saint Nicholas Orthodox Church, a Christian Orthodox church.[17]

There are many chapels in the village and they hold celebrations throughout the years. A festival is held on St. George's Day, due to the historic tradition of Kourbani. It was started in the village by Kolokotroni's father-in-law, who offered a calf each year to St. George. Now, only visitors have right to the food from a donated calf. There are also festivals on the day of the Pentecost in a Agia Triada. Festivals are also held at the church of Virgin Mary and Agia Paraskevi. Another chapel is Agia Solomoni.[3]

People from Akovos[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Απογραφή Πληθυσμού - Κατοικιών 2011. ΜΟΝΙΜΟΣ Πληθυσμός" (in Greek). Hellenic Statistical Authority. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f "Akovos". Greece.com. Retrieved November 24, 2016. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Akovos". Regional Guide of Peloponnese. March 28, 2008. Retrieved November 24, 2016. 
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h Source from Greek article: Εγκυκλοπαίδεια Πάπυρος Λαρούς Μπριτάννικα,τ.4
  5. ^ Setton, Kenneth M.; Hazard, Harry W. (September 1, 1977). A History of the Crusades: The Art and Architecture of the Crusader States. Univ of Wisconsin Press. p. 356. ISBN 978-0-299-06824-0. 
  6. ^ Setton, Kenneth M. (1978). The Papacy and the Levant, 1204-1571: The Fifteenth Century. American Philosophical Society. p. 197. ISBN 978-0-87169-127-9. 
  7. ^ a b Bon, Antoine (1969). La Morée franque. Recherches historiques, topographiques et archéologiques sur la principauté d’Achaïe (in French). Paris: De Boccard. 
  8. ^ Bon, Antoine (1969). La Morée franque. Recherches historiques, topographiques et archéologiques sur la principauté d’Achaïe (in French). Paris: De Boccard. pp. 105, 147–148, 394. 
  9. ^ Bon, Antoine (1969). La Morée franque. Recherches historiques, topographiques et archéologiques sur la principauté d’Achaïe (in French). Paris: De Boccard. pp. 190–193, 395. 
  10. ^ Bon, Antoine (1969). La Morée franque. Recherches historiques, topographiques et archéologiques sur la principauté d’Achaïe (in French). Paris: De Boccard. pp. 190–193, 202, 395. 
  11. ^ Topping, Peter (1975). "The Morea, 1311–1364". In Hazard, Harry W. A History of the Crusades, Volume III: The fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. University of Wisconsin Press. pp. 110–114, 117. ISBN 0-299-06670-3. 
  12. ^ The Gentleman's Magazine. Bradbury, Evans. 1904. p. 495. 
  13. ^ Setton, Kenneth M. (1978). The Papacy and the Levant, 1204-1571: The Fifteenth Century. American Philosophical Society. p. 196. ISBN 978-0-87169-127-9. 
  14. ^ "Falaisia". placeandsee.com. Retrieved November 24, 2016. 
  15. ^ "Goupata". Greece.com. Retrieved November 24, 2016. 
  16. ^ "Goupata to Akovos". Google maps. Retrieved November 24, 2016. 
  17. ^ "Akovos - Arcadia, Greece". Orthodox World. Retrieved November 24, 2016. 
  18. ^ TNH staff (May 9, 2014). "Chasing Maria Menounos: Good Luck Keeping Up!". The National Herald. Retrieved November 24, 2016. 

External links[edit]