Bay Parkway (BMT West End Line)

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Bay Parkway
NYCS-bull-trans-D.svg
New York City Subway rapid transit station
Bay Parkway NYC Subway Station by David Shankbone.jpg
Station statistics
Address Bay Parkway & 86th Street
Brooklyn, NY 11214
Borough Brooklyn
Locale Bensonhurst, Bath Beach
Coordinates 40°36′10″N 73°59′39″W / 40.602655°N 73.994293°W / 40.602655; -73.994293Coordinates: 40°36′10″N 73°59′39″W / 40.602655°N 73.994293°W / 40.602655; -73.994293
Division B (BMT)
Line BMT West End Line
Services       D all times (all times)
Transit connections Bus transport NYCT Bus: B1, B6, B82
Structure Elevated
Platforms 2 island platforms
cross-platform interchange
Tracks 3 (2 in regular service)
Other information
Opened December 29, 1916; 99 years ago (1916-12-29)
Accessible Handicapped/disabled access
Former/other names Bay Parkway – 22nd Avenue
Traffic
Passengers (2015) 2,368,617[1]Increase 0.3%
Rank 209 out of 422
Station succession
Next north 20th Avenue (local): D all times
62nd Street (express): no regular service
Next south 25th Avenue (local): D all times
Coney Island – Stillwell Avenue (express): no regular service


Next Handicapped/disabled access north Atlantic Avenue – Barclays Center: D all times
Next Handicapped/disabled access south Coney Island – Stillwell Avenue: D all times

Bay Parkway Station (Dual System BRT)
MPS New York City Subway System MPS
NRHP Reference # 05000670[2]
Added to NRHP July 6, 2005

Bay Parkway (formerly Bay Parkway – 22nd Avenue) is an express station on the BMT West End Line of the New York City Subway, located in Bensonhurst, Brooklyn at the intersection of Bay Parkway and 86th Street. The station is served by the D train at all times.

Station layout[edit]

Track layout
Legend
to 62 St
to 20 Av
to 25 Av
to Stillwell Av
P
Platform level
Northbound local NYCS-bull-trans-D.svg toward Norwood – 205th Street (20th Avenue)
Island platform, doors will open on the left Handicapped/disabled access
Peak-direction express No regular service
(No service: 62nd Street (north) or Coney Island – Stillwell Avenue (south))
Island platform, doors will open on the left Handicapped/disabled access
Southbound local NYCS-bull-trans-D.svg toward Coney Island – Stillwell Avenue (25th Avenue)
M Mezzanine to entrances/exits, station agent, MetroCard vending machines
Handicapped/disabled access (Elevator on NW corner of Bay Parkway and 86th Street)
G Street Level Entrances/Exits

This elevated station, opened on December 29, 1916, has two island platforms and three tracks. The center track is not normally used in revenue service. Both platforms have brown canopies with green frames and support columns in their center as well as wooden benches surrounded by green windscreens. On either sides, there are windscreen-style station signs and round lampposts. There is a railroad tower at either end of the station.

This station has one metal station house with concrete floors below the platforms and tracks. Two staircases from each platform go down to a waiting area/crossover, where a turnstile bank provides access to and from the station. Outside fare control, there is a token booth and four staircases going down to all corners of Bay Parkway and 86th Street. The station house formerly had windows on all four sides. However, all of them except the ones on the west side have been covered with tar.

This station was the terminus for the M train from 1987 to 2010 during rush hours. Although both platforms had signs indicating M trains used the center express track, they actually operated from the local tracks because there are no switches north of the station to allow trains to switch to the express track.[3] South of the platforms, two diamond crossovers were used for M trains to relay or be stored on the center track before switching to the Manhattan-bound local one for the trip northbound.

A concrete structure was built over the steel at this station. On July 6, 2005, it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

In 2012, the station was rehabilitated and three passenger elevators (one from each platform to the mezzanine, and one from the mezzanine to street level) were added with funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009.[4]

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Facts and Figures: Annual Subway Ridership". Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Retrieved 2016-04-19. 
  2. ^ "NPS Focus". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. Retrieved December 12, 2011. 
  3. ^ Marrero, Robert (2015-09-13). "469 Stations, 846 Miles" (PDF). B24 Blog, via Dropbox. Retrieved 2015-10-09. 
  4. ^ "MTA completes seven station rehabilitation projects along D Line". Railway Track & Structures. August 3, 2012. Retrieved August 6, 2012. 

External links[edit]