Bolshevik Party of India

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The Bolshevik Party of India (BPI) is a communist political party in India. The party was founded in 1939.[1]

Background[edit]

BPI traces its roots to the Bengal Labour Party, founded in 1933 and led by N. Dutt Mazumdar.[1] Leaders of the Bengal Labour Party disagreed with the role of CPI around the Tripuri session of the Indian National Congress and criticized the CPI for not siding with the All India Forward Bloc when Netaji Subhash Chandra Bose broke with the Congress.[1] These Bengal Labour Party leaders, such as N. Dutt Mazumdar, Sisir Roy, Biswanath Dubey and Ajit Roy founded BPI in 1939.[1]

In early 1944 the BPI politburo dissolved the Bengal Committee of the party and formed a 4-member secretariat for the province constisting of Barada Mukutmoni, Mani Bishnu Chaudhuri, Amar Naskar and Dinanath Gupta.[2]

Second World War[edit]

When the Second World War broke out, BPI characterized the war as 'imperialist' and called for a revolutionary mass movement against British rule in India.[1] However, with the onset of war between Germany and the Soviet Union the party did a U-turn and aligned with the CPI position and called for anti-fascist unity and support to the British war effort.[1]

Partition and Independence[edit]

BPI echoed other Indian left-wing formations in labelling the Partition of India as treason.[1] BPI, then recognized as a national party by the Election Commission of India, fielded a single candidate (Sudha Roy in Barrackpore) in the 1951-1952 parliamentary election. Roy obtained 25,792 votes (16.2% of vote in the constituency).[3] The party contested 8 seats in the 1952 West Bengal Legislative Assembly election. Together they obtained 20,117 votes (0.27% of the state-wide vote).[4]

In 1952 the Anandi Mukherji faction of the Forward Communist Party merged into BPI.[5]

The party joined the United Left Front ahead of the West Bengal Legislative Assembly election, 1957.[6] Amongst the BPI candidates, contesting as independents, where N. Dutt Mazumdar in Bhatpara (third place, 11.96%) and Barada Mukutmoni in Titagarh (fourth place, 6.92%).[7]

United Front[edit]

Ahead of the West Bengal Legislative Assembly election, 1967 BPI joined the People's United Left Front.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g S. Chowdhuri (7 November 2007). Leftism in India, 1917–1947. Palgrave Macmillan UK. pp. 205–206. ISBN 978-0-230-28804-1. 
  2. ^ Indian Council of Historical Research (1997). Towards freedom: documents on the movement for independence in India, 1943-1944. Oxford University Press. p. 1687. ISBN 978-0-19-563868-4. 
  3. ^ Election Commission of India. STATISTICAL REPORT ON GENERAL ELECTIONS, 1951 TO THE FIRST LOK SABHA VOLUME I (NATIONAL AND STATE ABSTRACTS & DETAILED RESULTS)
  4. ^ "Statistical Report on General Election, 1951 : To the Legislative Assembly of West Bengal" (PDF). Election Commission of India. Retrieved 2014-10-14. 
  5. ^ Bose, K., Forward Bloc, Madras: Tamil Nadu Academy of Political Science, 1988.
  6. ^ M.V.S. Koteswara Rao. Communist Parties and United Front - Experience in Kerala and West Bengal. Hyderabad: Prajasakti Book House, 2003. p. 216.
  7. ^ Election Commission of India. STATISTICAL REPORT ON GENERAL ELECTION, 1957 TO THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF WEST BENGAL
  8. ^ M.V.S. Koteswara Rao. Communist Parties and United Front - Experience in Kerala and West Bengal. Hyderabad: Prajasakti Book House, 2003. p. 227-229.