Borough president

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Borough President Party
The Bronx Ruben Diaz Jr. Democratic
Brooklyn Eric Adams Democratic
Manhattan Gale Brewer Democratic
Queens Melinda Katz Democratic
Staten Island James Oddo Republican

A borough president is an elective office in each of the five boroughs of New York City. Borough presidents currently have little power in New York City government and generally serve as ceremonial leaders who advocate for their boroughs on key issues.

Borough presidents advise the Mayor, comment on land-use items in their borough, advocate borough needs in the annual municipal budget process, appoint community boards, chair the borough boards, and serve as ex officio members of various boards and committees. They generally act as advocates for their boroughs at the mayoral agencies, the city council, the New York State government, public corporations, and private businesses. Their authorizing law is codified in title 4, sections 81 to 85 of the New York City Charter,[1] while their regulations are compiled in title 45 of the New York City Rules.

Roles and responsibilities[edit]

Borough presidents currently have a relatively small discretionary budget for projects within their boroughs. They advise the Mayor on issues relating to their boroughs, comment on land-use items in their boroughs, advocate for their boroughs' needs in the annual municipal budget process, appoint community boards, chair the boroughs' boards, and serve as ex officio members of various boards and committees. They also act as advocates for their boroughs at mayoral agencies, the City Council, the New York State government, public corporations, and private businesses. Borough presidents are currently elected by popular vote to four-year terms, and can serve up to three consecutive terms (12 years).[2]

Borough presidents influence the Uniform Land Use Review Procedure (ULURP) by appointing NYC community boards and voting on the applications.[3] The staff of boroughwide economic development corporations are often closely aligned with the borough president, and work closely with the New York City Economic Development Corporation, the primary coordinating agency of city-sponsored economic development.[3]

Borough Boards[edit]

Each of the five boroughs has a borough board.[4] They are composed of the borough president, council members from the borough, and the chairperson of each community board in the borough.[4] The borough boards can hold or conduct public or private hearings, adopt by-laws, prepare comprehensive and special purpose plans and make recommendations for land use and planning, mediate disputes and conflicts among two or more community districts, submit comprehensive statements of expense and capital budget priorities and needs, evaluate the progress of capital developments and the quality and quantity of services provided by agencies, and otherwise consider the needs of the borough.[5]

Community Boards[edit]

Each of the fifty-nine community districts has a community board composed of up to 50 volunteer members appointed by the borough president, half from nominations by City Council members representing the community district (i.e., whose council districts cover part of the community district).[6][7] Community boards advise on land use and zoning, participate in the city budget process, and address service delivery in their district.[8] Community boards act in an advisory capacity, and have no authority to make or enforce laws.[7][8]

History[edit]

On January 1, 1898, the boroughs of Manhattan, the Bronx, Brooklyn, Queens, and Richmond were created and consolidated into a single entity called the "City of New York." As part of the consolidation, all town and county governments within the city were dissolved, and their powers were given to the city and the boroughs.[9][10] Manhattan and the Bronx comprised New York County, Brooklyn was the same as Kings County, the borough of Queens was the western one-third of Queens County, and the borough of Richmond was the same as Richmond County. The boroughs assumed most county functions, but did not replace them. The five offices of borough president were created to administer many of the previous responsibilities of the mayors of Brooklyn and Long Island City, the executive branch functions of the towns in Queens and Richmond, and various county functions.

Memorial to Joseph Guider, Borough President of Brooklyn

The eastern two-thirds of Queens County was not part of the borough of Queens. On January 1, 1899, the New York State Legislature partitioned Queens County, forming Nassau County from the easternmost three towns — Oyster Bay, Hempstead (except the Rockaway peninsula portion), and North Hempstead, covering about 280 square miles (730 km2).[11] On April 19, 1912, the New York State Legislature passed a law forming Bronx County from part of New York County on January 1, 1914, with the latter then becoming the same as the Borough of Manhattan.[12]

The initial city charter established the five borough president offices with terms of four years, coinciding with the term of the Mayor. The salaries of the presidents of Manhattan, the Bronx, and Brooklyn were $5,000, and those of Queens and Richmond were $3,000. The borough presidents were subject to removal for cause by the mayor, with approval by the governor, and a replacement elected by the borough's aldermen and councilmen. Powers included membership and voting on the their borough's local boards (although without veto powers), an office in the borough hall, and appointive powers for a secretary, assistants, and clerks, which quickly became a source of political patronage. Along with the mayor, the comptroller and the president of the City Council, each of whom had two votes, the borough presidents each had one vote on the New York City Board of Estimate, which decided matters ranging from budgets to land use.[13]

In a later writer's words, the offices of the borough presidents were created to preserve "local pride and affection for the old municipalities" after consolidation.[14]

Borough presidents gradually gained more authority, assisting in the formulation of more aspects of the city budget and controlling land use, contracts, and franchise powers. Officials of political parties sometimes rewarded faithful public servants with nomination to the borough president position in primary elections, or election of an interim borough president via the aldermen or councilmen whose votes they controlled, in return for political patronage. The borough presidents positions were also sometimes stepping-stones to other elective offices such as judgeships. and in the case of Robert F. Wagner, Jr., mayor, although some borough presidents served for decades.

On March 22, 1989, the Supreme Court of the United States, in Board of Estimate of City of New York v. Morris (489 U.S. 688) unanimously declared the New York City Board of Estimate, which had no parallel anywhere else in the United States, unconstitutional on the grounds that Brooklyn, the city's most populous borough, with a population of 2.2 million at the time, had the same representation on the board as Staten Island, the city's least populous borough, with 350,000 residents, and therefore was a violation of the Fourteenth Amendment's Equal Protection Clause pursuant to the high court's 1964 "one man, one vote" decision.[13][15]

The city charter was quickly revised and passed in a referendum that fall, and the Board of Estimate was abolished. The offices of the borough presidents were retained, but with greatly reduced power. The borough budgets became the responsibility of the mayor and City Council. Borough presidents currently have a relatively small discretionary budget for projects within their boroughs. The last significant power of the borough presidents, to appoint members of the New York City Board of Education, was abolished when the Board of Education became the Department of Education on June 30, 2002.

The two major remaining appointments of the borough presidents are one member each on the City Planning Commission[16] and one member each of the Panel for Educational Policy. Borough presidents generally adopt specific projects to promote while in office, but since 1990, have been mainly the ceremonial leaders. Officially, they advise the Mayor on issues relating to their boroughs, comment on land-use items in their boroughs, advocate for their boroughs' needs in the annual municipal budget process, appoint community boards, chair the boroughs' boards, and serve as ex officio members of various boards and committees. They also act as advocates for their boroughs at mayoral agencies, the City Council, the New York State government, public corporations, and private businesses.

List of borough presidents[edit]

Manhattan Borough Presidents[edit]

  • Before 1874, when it annexed part of the Bronx, New York City was the same as the present Borough of Manhattan. For New York's mayors before 1898, see List of mayors of New York City.
# Borough President Party Dates in Office Notes
1 Augustus W. Peters
(1844–1898)
Democratic January 1, 1898–
December 29, 1898
  • elected by popular vote to a four-year term[17]
  • died in office[18]
vacant December 29, 1898 – January 5, 1899
2 James J. Coogan
(1845–1915)
Democratic January 5, 1899–
December 31, 1901
  • elected unanimously on January 5, 1899 by the Manhattan councilmen and aldermen after Peters' death[19]
  • did not run for re-election
3 Jacob A. Cantor
(1854–1921)
Fusion January 1, 1902–
December 31, 1903
  • elected by popular vote to a two-year term[20][21]
  • did not run for re-election
4 John F. Ahearn
(1853–1920)
Democratic January 1, 1904–
December 29, 1909
  • elected by popular vote to two two-year terms[22][23][24]
  • removed by Governor Charles Evans Hughes for failure to perform his duties,[25] but was re-elected as his own replacement by a 24-12 vote of the Manhattan aldermen[26] and managed to stay in office by legal challenges until the Court of Appeals ruled against him near the end of his term[27][28]
John Cloughen
(interim)
(died 1911)
Democratic December 30, 1909–
December 31, 1909
  • acted in place of Ahearn for much of December[29][30]
  • elected unanimously as a replacement on the eighth ballot by the aldermen from Manhattan[31]
5 George McAneny
(1869–1953)
Fusion/Democratic January 1, 1910–
December 31, 1913
  • elected by popular vote to a four-year term[32]
  • did not run for re-election[33][34]
6 Marcus M. Marks
(1858–1934)
Republican January 1, 1914–
December 31, 1917
  • elected by popular vote to a four-year term[33][34]
  • did not run for re-election
7 Frank L. Dowling
(c. 1865–1919)
Democratic January 1, 1918–
September 27, 1919
  • elected by popular vote to a four-year term[35]
  • died in office[36]
Michael F. Loughman
(acting)
(c. 1867–1937)
Democratic September 27, 1919–
October 16, 1919
  • became acting borough president upon Dowling's death[37]
8 Edward F. Boyle
(c. 1876–1943)
Democratic October 16, 1919–
November 17, 1919
  • elected interim borough president by the alderman of Manhattan to serve the remainder of the year[38]
  • resigned to become chairman of the New York State Industrial Commission[39]
Michael F. Loughman
(acting)
(c. 1867–1937)
Democratic November 17, 1919–
December 31, 1919
  • became acting borough president again upon Boyle's resignation[40]
9 Henry H. Curran Republican January 1, 1920–
December 31, 1921
  • elected by popular vote for the remainder of Dowling's term[41][42]
10 Julius Miller
(1880–1955)
Democratic January 1, 1922–
December 31, 1930
  • elected by popular vote to three four-year terms[43][44][45][46][47][48]
  • resigned after winning election as a justice of New York Supreme Court[49]
11 Samuel Levy
(1876–1953)
Democratic January 16, 1931–
December 31, 1937
  • elected interim borough president for the remainder of the year by a 20-3 vote of the aldermen of Manhattan[50]
  • elected by popular vote to a four-year term[51]
  • did not run for re-election in 1937 (ran for president of the City Council instead, and lost in both the Democratic and Republican primaries)[52]
12 Stanley M. Isaacs
(1882–1962)
Republican January 1, 1938–
December 31, 1941
  • elected by popular vote to a four-year term[53][54]
  • denied renomination on the Republican ticket in 1942 by the party committee (ran for election to the City Council on the Fusion and Citizen's Non-Partisan lines instead and won)[55][56][57]
13 Edgar J. Nathan
(1891–1965)
Republican January 1, 1942–
December 31, 1945
  • elected by popular vote to a four-year term[58][59][60]
  • lost popular vote for re-election in 1945[61]
14 Hugo E. Rogers
(1899–1974)
Democratic January 1, 1946–
December 31, 1949
  • elected by popular vote to a four-year term[61][62]
  • did not seek renomination in 1949[63]
15 Robert F. Wagner, Jr.
(1910–1991)
Democratic January 1, 1950–
December 31, 1953
  • elected by popular vote to a four-year term[64]
  • did not run for re-election in 1953 (ran for Mayor instead, and won)
16 Hulan E. Jack
(1906–1986)
Democratic January 1, 1954–
January 16, 1961
  • elected by popular vote to two four-year terms[65][66]
  • automatically removed when sentenced for criminal convictions for conspiracy and conflict of interest[67]
Louis A. Cioffi
(acting)
Democratic January 16, 1961–
January 31, 1961
  • became acting borough president upon Jack's sentencing[67]
17 Edward R. Dudley
(1911–2005)
Democratic January 31, 1961–
January 4, 1965
  • elected interim borough president with a 4-2 vote by the six members of the City Council from Manhattan for the remainder of Jack's term[68]
  • elected by popular vote to a four-year term[69]
  • resigned to take the seat as a justice on the New York State Supreme Court that he had won in the November 1964 election[70][71]
Earl Louis Brown
(acting)
(1903–1980)
Democratic January 4, 1965–
February 24, 1965
  • became acting borough president upon Dudley's resignation
18 Constance Baker Motley
(1921–2005)
Democratic February 24, 1965–
September 8, 1966
  • elected interim borough president with a 5-3 vote by the members of the City Council from Manhattan for the remainder of Dudley's term[72]
  • elected by popular vote to a four-year term[73]
  • appointed as a federal judge[74][75]
Leonard N. Cohen
(acting)
Democratic September 8, 1966–
September 13, 1966
  • became acting borough president upon Motley's resignation[75]
19 Percy E. Sutton
(1920–2009)
Democratic September 13, 1966–
December 31, 1977
  • elected by the City Council members of Manhattan to replace Motley for the remainder of the year[76]
  • elected by popular vote to the remainder of Motley's term[77]
  • elected by popular vote to two four-year terms[78][79]
  • did not run for re-election (ran for Mayor instead, and was defeated in the Democratic primary election)[80]
20 Andrew Stein
(born 1945)
Democratic January 1, 1978–
December 31, 1985
  • elected by popular vote to two four-year terms[80][81][82]
  • did not run for re-election (ran for City Council President president instead, and won)
21 David Dinkins
(born 1927)
Democratic January 1, 1986–
December 31, 1989
  • elected by popular vote to a four-year term[83]
  • did not run for re-election (ran for Mayor instead, and won)[84]
22 Ruth Messinger
(born 1941)
Democratic January 1, 1990–
December 31, 1997
  • elected by popular vote to two four-year terms[85][86]
  • did not run for re-election (ran for Mayor instead, and lost in the general election)
23 C. Virginia Fields
(born 1946)
Democratic January 1, 1998 – December 31, 2005
  • elected by popular vote two four-year terms[87][88]
  • did not run for re-election (ran for Mayor instead, and lost in the Democratic primary election)
24 Scott Stringer
(born 1960)
Democratic January 1, 2006–
December 31, 2013
  • elected by popular vote to two four-year terms[89][90]
  • did not run for re-election (ran for Comptroller instead, and won)
25 Gale Brewer
(born 1951)
Democratic January 1, 2014
–current
  • elected by popular vote to a four-year term[91]

Bronx Borough Presidents[edit]

# Borough President Party Dates in Office Notes
1 Louis M. Haffen
(1854–1935)
Democratic January 1, 1898–
August 29, 1909
2 John F. Murray
(1862–1928)
Democratic August 29, 1909–
December 31, 1909
  • became acting borough president upon the removal of Haffen, then was elected interim borough president for the remainder of Haffen's term by a unanimous vote of the eight aldermen of the Bronx[93]
  • did not run for re-election[32]
3 Cyrus C. Miller
(1866–1956)
Democratic January 1, 1910–
December 31, 1913
  • elected by popular vote to a four-year term[32]
  • retired and did not run for re-election in 1913[94]
4 Douglas Mathewson
(?1870–1948)
Republican/Fusion January 1, 1914–
December 31, 1917
  • elected by popular vote to a four-year term[33][95]
  • did not run for re-election in 1917 (ran for a City Court judge position instead, and won)[96]
5 Henry Bruckner
(1871–1942)
Democratic January 1, 1918–
December 31, 1933
6 James J. Lyons
(1890–1966)
Democratic January 1, 1934–
January 2, 1962
7 Joseph F. Periconi
(1910–1994)
Republican/Liberal/
Brotherhood
January 2, 1962–
December 28, 1965
  • elected by popular vote to a four-year term[69][101]
  • lost re-election by popular vote to Badillo in 1966[102]
8 Herman Badillo
(1929-2014)
Democratic December 28, 1965–
December 31, 1969
  • elected by popular vote to a four-year term[102][103]
  • did not run for re-election in 1969 (ran for Mayor instead, and lost in the Democratic primary[104][78]
9 Robert Abrams
(born 1938)
Democratic January 1, 1970–
December 31, 1978
vacant January 1, 1979–
January 5, 1979
10 Stanley Simon Democratic January 5, 1979–
March 11, 1987
  • elected by a 5-1-1 vote of the members of the City Council from the Bronx[107]
  • elected by popular vote to two four-year terms[82][83]
  • resigned prior to being indicted in the Wedtech scandal[108]
Cecil P. Joseph
(acting)
Democratic March 11, 1987–
April 15, 1987
  • became acting borough president upon Simon's resigation[109]
11 Fernando Ferrer
(born 1950)
Democratic April 15, 1987–
December 31, 2001
  • elected by a 5-to-1 vote of the City Council members from the Bronx to replace Simon[110][111]
  • elected by popular vote to four four-year terms[85][86][87]
  • ineligible to run for re-election in 2001 because of term limits[88]
12 Adolfo Carrión, Jr.
(born 1961)
Democratic January 1, 2002–
February 19, 2009
Earl D. Brown
(acting)
Democratic February 19, 2009–
May 21, 2009
  • became acting borough president upon Carrión's resignation[113]
13 Ruben Diaz, Jr.
(born 1973)
Democratic May 21, 2009–
current
  • elected by popular vote in a special election to replace Carrion[114][115]
  • re-elected by popular vote to two four-year terms[116][117]

Brooklyn Borough Presidents[edit]

# Borough President Party Dates in Office Notes
1 Edward M. Grout
(1861–1931)
Democratic January 1, 1898–
December 31, 1901
  • elected by popular vote to a four-year term[17][118]
  • did not run for re-election[119]
2 J. Edward Swanstrom
(1853–1911)
Fusion January 1, 1902–
December 31, 1903
  • elected by popular vote to a two-year term[20][120]
  • lost election to Littleton[121]
3 Martin W. Littleton
(1872–1934)
Democratic-Independent January 1, 1904–
December 31, 1905
  • elected by popular vote to a two-year term[121][122]
  • did not run for re-election
4 Bird S. Coler
(1867–1941)
Municipal Ownership League January 1, 1906–
December 31, 1909
5 Alfred E. Steers
(c. 1861–1948)
Democratic-Independent January 1, 1910–
December 31, 1913
  • elected by popular vote to a four-year term[32][126]
  • did not run for re-election
6 Lewis H. Pounds
(1861–1947)
Republican/Fusion January 1, 1914–
December 31, 1917
  • elected by popular vote to a four-year term[33][34][127]
  • lost popular vote for re-election to Riegelmann[35]
7 Edward J. Riegelmann
(1870–1941)
Democratic January 1, 1918–
December 31, 1924
  • elected by popular vote to two four-year terms[35][128][43][44]
  • resigned to become a New York State Supreme Court justice[129]
8 Joseph A. Guider
(1870–1926)
Democratic January 1, 1925–
September 22, 1926
  • elected interim borough president December 31, 1924 by a 21-3 vote of the Brooklyn aldermen for the remainder of Riegelmann's term[129]
  • elected by popular vote to a four-year term November 3, 1925[45][46]
  • died September 22, 1926[130]
9 James J. Byrne
(1863–1930)
Democratic September 22, 1926–
March 14, 1930
  • became acting borough president upon Guider's death[131]
  • elected interim borough president September 30, 1926 by a unanimous vote of the Brooklyn aldermen[132]
  • nominated by the Kings County Democratic Coummittee to replace Guider on the general election ballot and elected by popular vote to serve the remainder of Guider's term[133]
  • re-elected by popular vote to a four-year term[47]
  • died March 14, 1930[134]
10 Henry Hesterberg
(c. 1882–1950)
Democratic March 14, 1930–
December 11, 1933
  • became acting borough president during Byrne's final illness[135] and then elected interim borough president April 2, 1930 by a unanimous 23-0 (with one absent) vote of the Brooklyn aldermen[136]
  • elected by popular vote November 4, 1930 to the remainder of Byrne's term[137][138]
  • lost re-election popular vote to Ingersoll[51]
  • resigned about two weeks before the end of his term to accept a position on the city Water Board[139]
11 Peter A. Carey
(interim)
(c. 1873-1940)
Democratic December 13, 1933–
December 31, 1933
  • elected interim borough president by the Brooklyn aldermen December 13, 1933 after Hesterberg's resignation[140][141]
12 Raymond V. Ingersoll
(1875–1940)
Democratic/Fusion January 1, 1934–
February 24, 1940
  • elected by popular vote to two four-year terms[51][142][53]
  • died in office during second term[143]
Arthur R. Ebel
(acting)
Democratic February 24, 1940–
March 4, 1940
  • served as acting borough president during Ingersoll's final illness and after his death until Cashmore was elected[144][145]
13 John Cashmore
(1895–1961)
Democratic March 4, 1940–
May 7, 1961
  • elected interim borough president by a 4-2 vote of the City Council members from Brooklyn, with one abstention that was his own vote[146]
  • elected by popular vote November 5, 1940 to the remainder of Cashman's term, then re-elected by popular vote to five four-year terms[147][58][61][62][64][65][66]
  • died May 7, 1961[148]
14 John F. Hayes
(interim)
(1915–2001)
Democratic May 7, 1961–
July 6, 1961 (acting)
July 6, 1961–
December 31, 1961
(interim)
  • became acting borough president upon Cashmore's death, elected interim borough president by the members of the City Councilmen from Brooklyn[148][149]
  • did not run for election
15 Abe Stark
(1894–1972)
Democratic January 1, 1962–
September 8, 1970
16 Sebastian Leone
(1924–2016)
Democratic September 9, 1970–
December 31, 1976
  • elected interim borough president by the eleven Brooklyn councilmen[152][153]
  • re-elected by popular vote to a four-year term[79]
  • resigned to become a New York State Supreme Court justice[154]
17 Howard Golden
(born 1925)
Democratic January 3, 1977–
December 31, 2001
  • elected interim borough president for the remainder of Leone's term by an 11-0 vote of the thirteen City Council members from Brooklyn (two were not present)[155]
  • re-elected by popular vote to six four-year terms[80][81][82][83][85][87]
  • ineligible to run for re-election in 2013 because of term limits[88]
18 Marty Markowitz
(born 1945)
Democratic January 1, 2002–
December 31, 2013
  • elected by popular vote to three four-year terms[88][89][156]
  • ineligible to run for re-election in 2013 because of term limits[157]
19 Eric Adams
(born 1960)
Democratic January 1, 2014
–current
  • elected by popular vote to a four-year term[157][158]

Queens Borough Presidents[edit]

# Borough President Party Dates in Office Notes
1 Frederick Bowley
(1851–1916)
Democratic January 1, 1898–
December 31, 1901
  • elected by popular vote to a four-year term[17]
  • did not run for re-election
2 Joseph Cassidy
(c.1866–1920)
Democratic January 1, 1902–
December 31, 1905
  • elected by popular vote to two two-year terms[20][22]
  • lost popular vote in 1905[23][159]
3 Joseph Bermel
(1860–1921)
Democratic January 1, 1906–
April 29, 1908
  • elected by popular vote to a four-year term[23][159]
  • resigned while under investigation for corruption[160]
4 Lawrence Gresser
(1851–1935)
Democratic April 30, 1908–
September 27, 1911
  • elected by a 3-2 vote of the five aldermen from Queens to replace Bermel for the remainder of his term[161]
  • elected by popular vote to a four-year term[32]
  • removed by Governor John A. Dix for "inefficiency, incompetency, and neglect of duty"[162]
vacant September 27, 1911–
October 4, 1911
5 Maurice E. Connolly
(1881–1935)
Democratic October 4, 1911–
April 2, 1928
  • elected by a 3-2 vote of the five aldermen from Queens to replace Gresser for the remainder of his term[163]
  • re-elected by popular vote to four four-year terms[33][35][43][44][45][46][34]
  • resigned while under investigation for official conspiracy[164]
Michael J. Shugrue
(acting)
Democratic April 2, 1928–
April 18, 1928
  • became acting borough president upon Cassidy's resignation[164]
6 Bernard M. Patten Democratic April 18, 1928–
December 31, 1928
  • elected interim borough president for the remainder of the year by a 4-1 vote of the six aldermen from Queens (one not voting)[165]
  • lost popular vote to serve the remainder of Connolly's term[166]
7 George U. Harvey
(c. 1881–1946)
Republican January 1, 1929–
December 31, 1941
  • elected by popular vote to serve the remainder of Connolly's term[166][167]
  • re-elected by popular vote to three four-year terms[47][51][53]
  • lost by popular vote in the 1941 election[58]
8 James A. Burke
(1890–1965)
Democratic January 1, 1942–
December 31, 1949
9 Maurice A. FitzGerald
(1897–1951)
Democratic January 1, 1950–
August 25, 1951
  • elected by popular vote to a four-year term[64]
  • died in office[171]
10 Joseph F. Mafera
(1895–1967)
Democratic August 25, 1951–
September 5, 1951
(acting)
September 5, 1951–
December 31, 1951
(interim)
  • became acting borough president upon Fitzgerald's death[172]
  • elected interim borough president by a unanimous vote of the four members of the City Council from Queens[173]
  • did not run for re-election[174] and was named to the City Tax Commission by the Mayor[175]
11 James A. Lundy
(1903–1973)
Republican January 1, 1952–
December 31, 1957
  • elected by popular vote to the remainder of FitzGerald's term[176][177][178]
  • re-elected by popular vote to a four-year term[65]
  • lost re-election to Crisona in 1957[66]
12 James J. Crisona
(1907–2003)
Democratic January 1, 1958–
January 1, 1959
  • elected by popular vote to a four-year term[66][179]
  • resigned to accept the seat as a justice on the New York State Supreme Court that he had won in the November 1958 election[180][181][182]
vacant January 1, 1959–
January 5, 1959
13 John T. Clancy
(1903–1985)
Democratic January 5, 1959–
January 1, 1963
  • elected interim borough president for the remainder of the year by a 4-0 vote of the seven City Council from Queens, with one abstention[181]
  • elected by popular vote to serve the remainder of Crisona's term[183]
  • resigned to accept the position as Surrogate Court Judge that he had won in the November 1962 election[184]
14 Mario J. Cariello
(1907–1985)
Democratic January 2, 1963–
January 1, 1969
  • elected interim borough president by a unanimous vote of the five members of the City Council from Queens[185]
  • elected by popular vote to a four-year term[73]
  • resigned to accept the position as a justice on the New York Supreme Court that he had won in the November 1968 election[186][187]
15 Sidney Leviss
(1917–2007)
Democratic January 3, 1969–
September 18, 1971
  • acting borough president upon Cariello's resignation, then elected interim borough president for the remainder of the year by a 5-0 vote of the seven City Council from Queens, with two abstentions[187]
  • elected by popular vote to a four-year term[78]
  • resigned to run for a seat on the New York State Supreme Court[188]
16 Donald R. Manes
(1934–1986)
Democratic September 22, 1971–
February 11, 1986
  • elected by the seven members of the City Council from Queens to replace Leviss until the end of the year[189]
  • re-elected by popular vote to the remainder of Leviss' term[190]
  • re-elected by popular vote to four four-year terms[79][80][81][82][83]
  • resigned during a corruption investigation in advance of his indictment,[191] committed suicide a month later[192]
17 Claire Shulman
(born 1926)
Democratic February 11, 1986–
December 31, 2001
  • became acting borough president upon Manes' resignation[191]
  • elected unanimously by the nine City Council representatives from Queens to replace Manes until the end of the year[193]
  • elected by popular vote to fill the remainder of Manes' term[194]
  • elected by popular vote to three four-year terms[85][87]
  • ineligible to run for re-election in 2001 because of term limits[88]
18 Helen M. Marshall
(born 1929)
Democratic January 1, 2002–
December 31, 2013
  • elected by popular vote to three four-year terms[88][89][195]
  • ineligible to run for re-election in 2013 because of term limits
19 Melinda Katz
(born 1965)
Democratic January 1, 2014–
current
  • elected by popular vote to a four-year term[196]

Richmond/Staten Island Borough Presidents[edit]

The Borough of Richmond was renamed the Borough of Staten Island in 1975. The county is still named Richmond County.

# Borough President Party Dates in Office Notes
1 George Cromwell
(1860–1934)
Republican May 24, 1898–
December 31, 1913
  • elected by popular vote to a four-year term but not sworn into office until May because the election results were disputed and appealed[20][23][32][197][198]
  • re-elected two two-year terms and two four-year terms[22]
2 Charles J. McCormack
(1865–1915)
Democratic January 1, 1914–
July 11, 1915
  • elected by popular vote to a four-year term[33]
  • died in office[199]
Spire Pitou, Jr.
(acting
(c. 1874–1946
Democratic July 11, 1915–
July 29, 1915
  • became acting borough president upon McCormack's death[200]
3 Calvin D. Van Name
(1857–1924)
Democratic July 29, 1915–
December 31, 1921
  • elected by the three aldermen from Staten Island to serve the remainder of McCormack's term[201]
  • re-elected by popular vote to a four-year term[35]
  • did not run for re-election[202]
4 Matthew J. Cahill
(died 1922)
Democratic January 1, 1922–
July 14, 1922
  • elected by popular vote to a four-year term[43][44]
  • died in office[203]
5 John A. Lynch Democratic July 18, 1922–
December 31, 1933
  • elected interim borough president for the remainder of the year by a unanimous vote of the three aldermen of Staten Island[204]
  • elected by popular vote to serve the remainder of Cahill's term[205]
  • elected by popular vote to two four-year terms[45][46][47]
  • denied a slot on the Democratic ballot by Tammany Hall,[206] ran as an independent,[207][208] but came in second place[51]
6 Joseph A. Palma
(1889–1969)
Republican January 1, 1934–
December 31, 1945
7 Cornelius A. Hall
(1889–1953)
Democratic January 1, 1946–
February 12, 1953
  • elected by popular vote to two four-year terms[61][62][64]
  • retired due to illness,[211] died less than a month later[212]
Thomas F. Reilly
(acting)
Democratic February 12, 1953–
February 20, 1953
  • became acting borough president upon Hall's resignation[211]
8 Edward G. Baker
(1906–1971)
Democratic February 20, 1953–
December 31, 1954
  • elected by a 2-1 vote, with Mayor Vincent Impellitteri breaking the tie vote between the two City Council members from Staten Island[213]
  • re-elected by popular vote to a four-year term[65]
  • resigned after winning a seat as a justice on the New York State Supreme Court[214]
9 Albert V. Maniscalco
(1908–1998)
Democratic December 31, 1954–
December 31, 1965
  • elected interim borough president to replace Baker for one year, until December 31, 1955, by a 2-0 vote of the City Council members from Staten Island[215]
  • elected by popular vote for the remainder of Baker's term[216]
  • elected by popular vote to two four-year terms[66][69]
  • lost re-election by popular vote to Connor in 1965[73]
10 Robert T. Connor
(1919–2009)
Republican January 1, 1966–
June 10, 1977
  • elected by popular vote to three four-year terms[73][78][79]
  • resigned to become a deputy assistant to the Secretary of the Navy[217]
11 Anthony R. Gaeta
(1927–1988)
Democratic June 10, 1977–
November 10, 1984
  • elected by a 2-2 vote of the four members of the City Council, with Mayor Abraham Beame needed to break the tie[217]
  • elected by popular vote to two four-year terms[80][81][82]
  • retired during his second term[218]
12 Ralph J. Lamberti
(born 1933)
Democratic November 10, 1984–
December 31, 1989
  • elected by the two members of the City Council from Staten Island to replace Gaeta, who resigned[219]
  • elected by popular vote to a four-year term[83]
  • lost election to Molinari[85]
13 Guy V. Molinari
(born 1928)
Republican January 1, 1990–
December 31, 2001
  • elected by popular vote to three four-year terms[85][87]
  • ineligible to run for re-election in 2001 because of term limits[88]
14 James Molinaro
(born 1931)
Conservative January 1, 2002–
December 31, 2013
  • elected by popular vote to three four-year terms[89][220]
  • ineligible to run for re-election in 2013 because of term limits[88]
15 James Oddo
(born 1966)
Republican January 1, 2014–
current
  • elected by popular vote to a four-year term[221]

See also[edit]


References[edit]

  1. ^ "New York City Charter — Borough Presidents". library.amlegal.com. American Legal Publishing. Retrieved 20 November 2016. 
  2. ^ Croghan, Lore (January 14, 2013). "A Champion for Brooklyn: Pols Have Raised Big Bucks for Race to Become Borough President". New York Daily News. Retrieved 19 November 2016. 
  3. ^ a b Eichenthal, David R. (1990). "The Other Elected Officials". Urban Politics, New York Style. New York University. p. 99. 
  4. ^ a b New York City Charter § 85(a)
  5. ^ New York City Charter § 85(b)
  6. ^ New York City Charter § 2800(a)
  7. ^ a b "About Community Boards". NYC Mayor's Community Affairs Unit. Retrieved 26 November 2016. 
  8. ^ a b Berg, Bruce (2007). New York City Politics: Governing Gotham. Rutgers University Press. p. 277. 
  9. ^ New York. Laws of New York; 1897, 120th session, chapter 378, section 2, p. 2.
  10. ^ The Greater New York Charter — Submitted to the Legislature of the State of New York on February 20, 1897, by the Commission appointed pursuant to Chapter 488 of the Laws of 1896 (PDF). 1897. pp. 2–3. Retrieved 25 November 2016. 
  11. ^ New York. Laws of New York (1899), 121st session, chapter 588, section 1, p. 1336.
  12. ^ New York. Laws of New York; 1912, 135th Session, Chapter 548; Section 1; Page 1352.
  13. ^ a b Cornell Law School Supreme Court Collection: Board of Estimate of City of New York v. Morris, accessed June 12, 2006
  14. ^ Jackson, Kenneth T. (1995). The Encyclopedia of New York City. New Haven, Connecticut: New York Historical Society and Yale University Press. pp. 129–130. ISBN 0-300-05536-6. 
  15. ^ Greenhouse, Linda (March 23, 1989). "Justices Void New York City's Government — Demand Voter Equality in All Boroughs". New York Times. Retrieved 25 November 2016. 
  16. ^ "New York City Charter, chapter 8, section 192". library.amlegal.com. American Legal Publishing. Retrieved 20 November 2016. 
  17. ^ a b c d "Democrats Take All — The Tammany Ticket Makes Almost a Clean Sweep of the Greater City — Only Two Republicans in the Council — Van Wyck's Plurality Is 80,316 — Seth Low Ran Nearly 40,000 Ahead of His Ticket — The Republicans Lose 21 Assemblymen and Elect Only 11 Candidates to the Board of Aldermen". New York Times. November 4, 1897. p. 1. Retrieved 19 November 2016. 
  18. ^ "Augustus W. Peters Dead — President of Manhattan Borough Succumbs to Heart Disease — Found Sitting in a Chair — The Barking of a Dog Summoned His Friend Henry Chaurant to His Room in the Early Morning". New York Times. December 30, 1898. p. 12. Retrieved 20 November 2016. 
  19. ^ "New Borough President — James J. Coogan Elected to Succeed the Late A.W. Peters — His Selection a Surprise — Members of Municipal Assembly Did Not Know for Whom They Were to Vote Until the Last Minute". New York Times. January 6, 1899. p. 12. Retrieved 20 November 2016. 
  20. ^ a b c d e "Victory For The Fusion Ticket — Seth Low Elected Mayor by About 33,000 Plurality — Jerome Defeats Unger — Fusion Borough Presidents Chosen in Three Boroughs — Van Wyck Left Far Behind — Contest Close for Sheriff in This County — Jerome Wins by About 15,000 — Fusion Justices Win — Democrats Carry Only Queens and Bronx". New York Times. November 6, 1901. p. 1. Retrieved 20 November 2016. 
  21. ^ "Manhattan Borough's President at Work — Jacob A. Cantor Quickly Organizes His Official Staff — His Dispute With Mr. Fornes". New York Times. January 2, 1902. p. 14. Retrieved 19 November 2016. 
  22. ^ a b c d "M'Clellan — Carries the City by Over 61,000 Plurality — Tammany Controls Boards of Estimate and Aldermen — Littleton Loses in Brooklyn — Devery Gets About 3,000 Votes". New York Times. November 1903. p. 1. Retrieved 20 November 2016. 
  23. ^ a b c d e f "Ahearn and Haffen Won — The Only Two Borough President Tammany Elected — Cassidy Beaten". New York Times. Retrieved 21 November 2016. 
  24. ^ "Borough President Installed — Jacob A. Cantor Welcomes His Successor in Office and Compliments Are Exchanged". New York Times. January 2, 1904. p. 14. Retrieved 19 November 2016. 
  25. ^ "Hughes Turns Ahearn Out — "He Failed to Perform His Duty, with Reference to the Streets" — Remissness Was Flagrant — Governor Satisfied That Concern Doing Carpentry Work Was Cover for Walker — The City Was Despoiled — Attempt Will Be Made to Obtain an Injunction Which Will Retain Him in Office". New York Times. December 10, 1907. p. 1. Retrieved 21 November 2016. 
  26. ^ "Ahearn Re-Elected; Hughes Not To Act — Thinks Borough President's Title to Office Should Be Tested in the Courts — Republicans Aid Tammany — Three of Them and M.O.L. Aldermen Votes for Ahearn — He Issues Statement Accusing the Mayor". New York Times. December 20, 1907. p. 18. Retrieved 21 November 2016. 
  27. ^ "Ahearn, Ruled Out, Won't Give Up Fight — Court of Appeals Holds Illegal His Re-election as Borough President After Removal — His Official Acts Valid — Hopes to Serve Remainder of His Original Term by Prolonging the Legal Battle to Oust Him". New York Times. October 30, 1909. p. 5. Retrieved 21 November 2016. 
  28. ^ "John F. Ahearn Dies at His Home Here — Among the Last of the Political Leaders of the Old Tammany Regime — Five Times State Senator — Lost Long Fight to Retain Borough Presidency After Removal by Governor Hughes". New York Times. December 20, 1902. Retrieved 21 November 2016. 
  29. ^ "Revokes Higher Pay For City Justices — Public Opposition to $4,000 Increase Forces Estimate Board to Reverse Itself — Justice Scott Takes Blame — Urged Bigger Salary, He Says, Without His Associates' Consent — Metz Alone for It". New York Times. November 30, 1909. p. 7. Retrieved 21 November 2016. 
  30. ^ "May Hold Ahearn For Salary — J.G. Collins, REmoved, Gets a $36,000 Verdict — New Election Tuesday". New York Times. December 11, 1909. p. 5. Retrieved 21 November 2016. 
  31. ^ "Cloughen Succeeds Ahearn — Aldermanic Deadlock Broken in Time to Give Him Two Days Service". New York Times. December 30, 1909. p. 4. Retrieved 21 November 2016. 
  32. ^ a b c d e f "Gaynor Wins; Tammany Loses All The Rest — A Clean Sweep by Fusion of All Offices Outside of the Mayoralty — Gaynor's Plurality 72,500 — But Fusion Has Carried the Board of Estimate and with It City Control — Whitman District Attorney — Beats George Gordon Battle for the Office by About 22,000 Votes — All Patronage to Fusion — Controllership, Aldermanic Presidency, County Offices, and Supreme Court — All Gone — Borough Presidents, Too — McAneny Wins in Manhattan, Gresser Carries Queens, Miller the Bronx — And Roesch Is Beaten". New York Times. November 3, 1909. p. 1. Retrieved 19 November 2016. 
  33. ^ a b c d e f "Tammany's Rout Made Complete in City and State — New York City Gave Mitchel a Plurality of 121,209 Over McCall — One Lone Office Saved — Wigwam May Get a Vote in the Board of Estimate from McCormack — Werner's Fate Is in Doubt — With Returns from 4 Counties Incomplete He May Have Lost Chief Judgeship — Hiscock, Associate, Wins — 29 Out of 46 Assemblymen Who Impeached Sulzer Are Beaten — Cardozo Wins in the City — Heavy Fusion Vote in the Bronx Deprives Tammany of a Supreme Court Judgeship". New York Times. November 6, 1913. p. 1. Retrieved 21 November 2016. 
  34. ^ a b c d "Not One Seat In Board Of Estimate Saved to Tammany — Fusion Aldermen Also — McAneny and Prendergast In Safely With Other Fusion Borough Heads — Close in New York County — With Just a Possibility at Midnight That Murphy May Save It — Neck and Neck in Bronx — Matthewson, (Rep.,) May Have Beaten Tammany and Third Ticket Up There — Queens Easy For Connolly — Brooklyn Gave Fusion 54,808 Plurality — Republicans Carry County — Prendergast's Vote Cut". New York Times. November 5, 1913. p. 1. Retrieved 19 November 2016. 
  35. ^ a b c d e f "A Tammany Sweep — Hylan Can Get Every Vote in the Board of Estimate — Carries Every Borough — His Vote Is 293,382, Mitchel's 148,060, and Hillquit's 138,793 — Lewis, Attorney General — Beaten in This City, but Had a Big Plurality Up-State — Hylan Promises Loyalty". New York Times. November 7, 1917. p. 1. Retrieved 21 November 2016. 
  36. ^ "Frank L. Dowling Dies of Pneumonia — President of Manhattan Borough Stricken After Attack of Gall Stones a Week Ago — Long Career in Politics — Former President of Board of Aldermen Served 18 Years in That Body — Mayor Pays Tribute". New York Times. September 28, 1919. p. 22. Retrieved 21 November 2016. 
  37. ^ "May Pick Loughman for Dowling's Post — Public Works Head Reported to be Tammany Selection to Act Until Jan. 1 — Subject to Come Up Today — Both Democrats and Republicans to Have Candidates In Election for Two-Year Term". New York Times. October 1, 1919. p. 19. Retrieved 21 November 2016. 
  38. ^ "Curran Opens fight on Tammany Boss — Denounces Methods of Opposition in Accepting Nomination for Dowling's Post — Dr. Butler Joins Campaign — Mrs. Jean Norris Places Borough President Boyle in Nomination at Tammany Hall". New York Times. October 17, 1919. p. 15. Retrieved 21 November 2016. 
  39. ^ "Boyle Quits Borough Job — Resigns as Manhattan President to Go to State Industrial Commission". New York Times. November 18, 1919. p. 12. Retrieved 21 November 2016. 
  40. ^ "Curran Appoints Eleven to Office — President-Elect of Borough of Manhattan Says Experience and Ability Will Be the Test — Fay For Public Works — Amos Schaeffer Retained as Consulting Engineer — Maimed Veteran Gets Minor Job". New York Times. December 30, 1919. p. 3. Retrieved 21 November 2016. 
  41. ^ "La Guardia Wins by 1,530 — Beats Moran for President of Board of Aldermen in a Close Contest — Koenig Ordered Vigilance — Warned Republican Chairmento Stay by the Ballot Boxes and Scrutinize Count — Curran Defeats Boyle — Five Republican Votes in Board of Estimate Assured — Clean Cut Result in Supreme Court". New York Times. November 5, 1919. p. 1. Retrieved 21 November 2016. 
  42. ^ "Curran Sworn In, LaGuardia Also — Borough President and Head of Aldermen Silent on Public Issues — Two Resignations Asked — Curran Pays Tribute to the Late Frank L. Dowling — Says Fairer Man Never Lived". New York Times. January 2, 1920. p. 8. Retrieved 21 November 2016. 
  43. ^ a b c d e "Borough Presidents". New York Times. November 9, 1921. p. 2. Retrieved 21 November 2016. 
  44. ^ a b c d e "The City Vote — Hylan's Plurality 417,986 — Craig's 249,252 — Banton's 83,680". New York Times. November 10, 1921. p. 4. Retrieved 19 November 2016. 
  45. ^ a b c d e "Supreme Court Justices, District Attorneys, City Court Justice, Kings Surrogate — Officials Elected". New York Times. November 4, 1925. p. 3. Retrieved 19 November 2016. 
  46. ^ a b c d e "Final Returns Add to Tammany Sweep — All but Three of 63 Candidates for Aldermen, and 56 for Assembly Are Elected — Walker Wins by 401,581 — Banton's Plurality 105,421 — Wigwam Captures 10th District — Connolly Issues Statement". New York Times. November 5, 1925. p. 2. Retrieved 21 November 2016. 
  47. ^ a b c d e "Controller, Aldermanic President and Borough Presidents Elected". New York Times. November 6, 1929. p. 2. Retrieved 22 November 2016. 
  48. ^ "Greet Brooklyn Officials — Borough President Riegelmann and Others Are Now in Office". New York Times. January 2, 1918. p. 3. Retrieved 19 November 2016. 
  49. ^ "Miller Resigns to Become Judge — Borough President Bids Farewell to Staff and Will Take Up New Duties Monday — Launched Many Projects — Occupied Office for Nine Years — Herrick Is Leading Candidate for the Place". New York Times. January 1, 1931. p. 18. Retrieved 22 November 2016. 
  50. ^ "Levy is Elected Borough President — Educator, Choice of Walker and Curry, Gets All of the 19 Democratic Ballots — Also a Republican Vote — Sworn In by Justice Miller Under New Oath That He Did Not Buy Office — Thanks Party for Honor — Serves Until Next December — Goes to Municipal Building and Greets Aides". New York Times. January 17, 1931. p. 3. Retrieved 22 November 2016. 
  51. ^ a b c d e f g Hagerty, James A. (November 8, 1933). "M'Kee Runs Second — Loses Even Bronx Smashing Blow To Farley — LaGuardia by 254,506 — Carries Every Borough, Sweeping in His Chief Running-Mates — Tammany Forces Routed — O'Brien Loses Manhattan by 5,895 — Levy Victor, Dodge Wins, Prial Loses — Pecora, Straus Defeated — Fusion Victory is First in 20 Years — Vote Cast is Biggest in City Election". New York Times. p. 1. Retrieved 19 November 2016. 
  52. ^ Hagerty, James A. (September 17, 1937). "Blow to Tammany — La Guardia Margin Is 35,000, Gets Good Write-In Vote — 2-Man Fight in November — Senator, Though He Carried Manhattan, Is Expected to Drop Out of Contest — M'Goldrick is Nominated — He and Morris Are Victors Over Prial and Levy — Dewey is Unopposed — Taylor Named". New York Times. p. 1. Retrieved 22 November 2016. 
  53. ^ a b c d e Hagerty, James A. (November 3, 1937). "Dewey Lead 108,823 — Ingersoll, Harvey, Lyons, Isaacs and Palma Are Victorious — Justice Levy Wins — Strong Tammany Chiefs Lose Districts — Foley is Re-Elected". New York Times. p. 1. Retrieved 22 November 2016. 
  54. ^ "New Fusion Rule Starts in City; Many Jobs Filled — Bureau Heads Stay — La Guardia Is the First Reform Mayor to Be Re-elected — Kracke Heads Assessors — Finegan is Made a Magistrate, MacInnes Deputy Treasurer — McGoldrick Sworn In". New York Times. January 2, 1938. p. 1. Retrieved 22 November 2016. 
  55. ^ Moscow, Warren (July 30, 1941). "Isaacs Dropped by Republicans — Borough President Declares He Will Fight in Primaries — Assails Curran". New York Times. p. 1. Retrieved 22 November 2016. 
  56. ^ "Incumbents Lead in Council Race — Re-election of Most Seen on 2d Day of P.R. Count — Rise of 4 Seats Due — Red is High on Kings List — Caccione Running Seventh — Negro Clergyman Second in Manhattan Balloting". New York Times. November 7, 1941. p. 16. Retrieved 22 November 2016. 
  57. ^ "Second P.R. Count Due in Manhattan — First-Choice Tally in Queens Also Expected to Be Ready by This Morning — Fourth to Begin in Bronx — Totaling of Council Ballots Is at a Standstill in All but One Borough Over Sunday". New York Times. November 10, 1941. p. 10. Retrieved 22 November 2016. 
  58. ^ a b c d e f "Harvey's Reign Ended by Burke — Queens Head Held Office for 13 Years — Lyons, Nathan, Palma, Cashmore Win". New York Times. November 5, 1941. p. 1. Retrieved 22 November 2016. 
  59. ^ "Nathan Prominent Lawyer — Partner in Firm Once Headed by Cardozo, His Cousin". New York Times. November 5, 1941. p. 14. Retrieved 22 November 2016. 
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  62. ^ a b c d e "New Borough Head Served in 2 Wars — Captain Hugo E. Rogers, Lawyer and Engineer, Never Made a Speech in Campaign". New York Times. November 7, 1945. p. 5. Retrieved 22 November 2016. 
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