Lebanese general election, 2009

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Lebanese general election, 2009
Lebanon
2005 ←
7 June 2009 → 2017

All 128 seats to the Parliament of Lebanon
  First party Second party Third party
  Hariri in April 2009.jpg Michel Aoun (cropped).jpg Nabih Berri.jpg
Leader Saad Hariri Michel Aoun Nabih Berri
Party Future Movement Free Patriotic Movement Amal Movement
Alliance March 14 March 8 March 8
Leader's seat Beirut 3 Keserwan Tebnine
Last election 36 seats, 28.12% 15 seats, 11.71% 14 seats, 10.93%
Seats won 26 19 13
Seat change Decrease 10 Increase 4 Decrease 1
Percentage 20,31% 14,84% 10,16%

  Fourth party Fifth party Sixth party
  Sayyed Hassan Nasrallah.jpg Samir Geagea (cropped).jpg Jumblatt.jpg
Leader Hassan Nasrallah Samir Geagea Walid Jumblatt
Party Hezbollah Lebanese Forces Progressive Socialist Party
Alliance March 8 March 14 None
Leader's seat None None Chouf
Last election 14 seats, 10.93% 6 seats, 4.68% 16 seats, 12.50%
Seats won 12 8 7
Seat change Decrease 2 Increase 2 Decrease 9
Percentage 9,37% 6,25% 5,46%

  Seventh party Eighth party
  Amine Gemayel 2007.jpg Sleiman Frangieh 2.jpg
Leader Amine Gemayel Suleiman Frangieh, Jr.
Party Kataeb Party Marada Movement
Alliance March 14 March 8
Leader's seat None Zgharta
Last election 2 seats, 1,52% 0 seat, 0%
Seats won 5 3
Seat change Increase 3 Increase 3
Percentage 3,90% 2,34%

Lebanese election 2009.png

Areas with a March 14 majority in blue, areas with a March 8 majority in orange

Prime Minister before election

Fouad Siniora
March 14

Elected Prime Minister

Saad Hariri
March 14

Coat of arms of Lebanon.svg
This article is part of a series on the
politics and government of
Lebanon

Parliamentary elections were held in Lebanon on 7 June 2009.[1][2]

Background[edit]

Prior to the election, the process to lower the voting age from 21 to 18 years was put into motion, but as this requires a constitutional amendment, it did not happen before the election.[3]

Allocation of seats[edit]

Following a compromise reached in the Doha Agreement on May 2008 between the government and opposition, a new electoral law was put in place, as shown in the table below.[4] It was passed on 29 September 2008.[5]

Seat allocation

according to The Doha Agreement[6]

Total Maronites Shi'a Sunni Greek Orthodox Druze Armenian Orthodox Greek Catholic Alawite Protestant Other Christians 14 March 8 March
Beirut
19
Beirut 1 5 1 - - 1 - 1 1 - - 1 5 0
Beirut 2 4 - 1 1 - - 2 - - - - 2 2
Beirut 3 10 - 1 5 1 1 - - - 1 1 10 0
Bekaa 23 Baalbek
+Hermel
10 1 6 2 - - - 1 - - - 0 10
Zahleh 7 1 1 1 1 - 1 2 - - - 7 0
Rashaya
+West Bekaa
6 1 1 2 1 1 - - - - - 6 0
Mount Lebanon 35 Jbeil 3 2 1 - - - - - - - - 0 3
Kisrawan 5 5 - - - - - - - - - 0 5
North Metn 8 4 - - 2 - 1 1 - - - 2 6
Baabda 6 3 2 - - 1 - - - - - 0 6
Aley 5 2 - - 1 2 - - - - - 4 1
Chouf 8 3 - 2 - 2 - 1 - - - 8 0
North Lebanon 28 Akkar 7 1 - 3 2 - - - 1 - - 7 0
Dinniyeh
+Minieh
3 - - 3 - - - - - - - 3 0
Bsharreh 2 2 - - - - - - - - - 2 0
Tripoli 8 1 - 5 1 - - - 1 - - 8 0
Zgharta 3 3 - - - - - - - - - 0 3
Koura 3 - - - 3 - - - - - - 3 0
Batrun 2 2 - - - - - - - - - 2 0
South Lebanon 23 Saida 2 - - 2 - - - - - - - 2 0
Tyre 4 - 4 - - - - - - - - 0 4
Zahrani 3 - 2 - - - - 1 - - - 0 3
Hasbaya
+Marjeyoun
5 - 2 1 1 1 - - - - - 0 5
Nabatiyeh 3 - 3 - - - - - - - - 0 3
Bint Jbeil 3 - 3 - - - - - - - - 0 3
Jezzine 3 2 - - - - - 1 - - - 0 3
Total 128 128 34 27 27 14 8 5 8 2 1 2 71 57

Results[edit]

Logo of the Lebanese general election, 2009

Preliminary results indicated that the turnout had been as high as 55%.[7] The March 14 Alliance garnered 71 seats in the 128-member parliament, while the March 8 Alliance won 57 seats. This result is virtually the same as the result from the election in 2005. However, the March 14 alliance saw this as a moral victory over Hezbollah, who led the March 8 Alliance, and the balance of power was expected to shift in its favor.[8] Many observers expect to see the emergence of a National Unity Government similar to that created following the Doha Agreement in 2008.[9]

Election Results for each alliance[10] Total % 14M 14 March % 8M 8 March
Beirut
19
Beirut 1 5 52.1% 5 47.9% 0
Beirut 2 4 50.5% 2 49.5% 2
Beirut 3 10 69.6% 10 31.4% 0
Bekaa 23 Baalbek
+Hermel
10 21.6% 0 78.4% 10
Zahleh 7 52.7% 7 47.3% 0
Rashaya
+West Bekaa
6 53.3% 6 46.7% 0
Mount Lebanon 35 Jbeil 3 39.6% 0 60.4% 3
Kisrawan 5 44.9% 0 55.1% 5
North Metn 8 48.4% 2 51.6% 6
Baabda 6 43.8% 0 56.2% 6
Aley 5 61.2% 4 38.8% 1
Chouf 8 75.6% 8 24.4% 0
North Lebanon 28 Akkar 7 63.1% 7 36.9% 0
Dinniyeh
+Minnieh
3 70.9% 3 29.1% 0
Bsharreh 2 73.4% 2 26.6% 0
Tripoli 8 63.5% 8 36.5% 0
Zgharta 3 44.2% 0 55.8% 3
Koura 3 51.1% 3 48.9% 0
Batrun 2 52.2% 2 47.8% 0
South Lebanon 23 Saida 2 63.9% 2 36.1% 0
Tyre 4 06.8% 0 93.2% 4
Zahrani 3 10.0% 0 90.0% 3
Hasbaya
+Marjeyoun
5 21.4% 0 78.6% 5
Nabatiyeh 3 11.6% 0 88.4% 3
Bint Jbeil 3 05.8% 0 94.2% 3
Jezzine 3 25.5% 0 74.5% 3
Total 128 128 44.5% 71 55.5% 57

By party after the Elections[edit]

Alliances Opponents
Parties align=left Kataeb Party (Hizb al-Kataeb)
Future Movement
Murr Bloc
Glory Movement (Harakat Majd)
Social Democrat Hunchakian Party
Armenian Democratic Liberal Party
National Liberal Party (Hizbu-l-waTaniyyīni-l-aHrār)
Government rowspan=4 valign=top align="right" United States
France
Saudi Arabia
Qatar
Source

By party after the designation of Najib Mikati in January 2011[edit]

e • d Summary of the 7 June 2009 Lebanese Parliament election results
Alliances Seats Parties Seats
Government
68
29 Change and Reform bloc
     Free Patriotic Movement (Tayyar Al-Watani Al-Horr) 19
     Lebanese Democratic Party (Hizb al-democraty al-lubnany) 4
     Marada Movement 3
     Armenian Revolutionary Federation (Tashnag) 2
     Solidarity Party (Hizb Al-Tadamon Al-Lubnany) 1
29 March 8 Alliance
     Amal Movement (Harakat Amal) 13
     Loyalty to the Resistance (Hezbollah) 12
     Syrian Social Nationalist Party (al-Hizb al-Qawmi al-souri al ijtima'i) 2
     Arab Socialist Ba'ath Party 2
10 Pro-Government Independents
     Progressive Socialist Party 7
     Glory Movement 2
     Other 1
Opposition
58
58 March 14 Alliance
     Future Movement (Tayyar Al Mustaqbal) 26
     Lebanese Forces (al-Quwāt al-Lubnāniyya) 8
     Kataeb Party (Hizb al-Kataeb) 5
     Murr Bloc 2
     Social Democrat Hunchakian Party (Social Democrat Hunchakian Party) 2
     Islamic Group (Jamaa al-Islamiya) 1
     Armenian Democratic Liberal Party (Ramgavar Party) 1
     Democratic Left Movement (ĥarakatu-l-yasāri-d-dimuqrātī) 1
     National Liberal Party (Hizbu-l-waTaniyyīni-l-aHrār) 1
     Independents (including Zahle-Bloc 6) 11
 –  – Total 126

Formation of government[edit]

As is typical of Lebanese politics political wrangling after the elections took 5 months.[11] Only in November was the composition of the new cabinet agreed upon: 15 seats for the March 14 Alliance, 10 for the March 8 Alliance, and 5 nominated by Lebanese President Michel Suleiman, who has cast himself as a neutral party between the two main political blocks.[12]

Aftermath[edit]

The government fell in January 2011 after the March 8 alliance's 11 ministers withdrew from the government over PM Hariri's refusal to convene a cabinet meeting to discuss possible indictments to be issued by the Special Tribunal for Lebanon.[13]

The March 8 alliance former a new government in the ensuing six months.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Lebanon's ruling coalition urges lawmakers to ban presidential election - People's Daily Online
  2. ^ http://english.people.com.cn/90001/90777/90854/6567795.html
  3. ^ "Lebanon voting age lowered by MPs". BBC News. 2009-03-19. Retrieved 2010-05-07. 
  4. ^ "Lebanon rivals agree crisis deal". BBC News. 2008-05-21. Retrieved 2010-05-07. 
  5. ^ "Lebanon approves new election law". BBC News. 2008-09-30. Retrieved 2010-05-07. 
  6. ^ Blacksmiths of Lebanon: 2009 Electoral Districts
  7. ^ Slackman, Michael (7 June 2009). "Pro-Western Bloc Defeats Hezbollah in Lebanon Vote". NYT. Retrieved 7 June 2009. 
  8. ^ Slackman, Michael (2009-06-09). "U.S.-Backed Alliance Wins Election in Lebanon". New York Times. Retrieved 2010-05-07. 
  9. ^ "March 14 bloc wins Lebanon election". Al Jazeera English. 
  10. ^ Elections 09 - Lebanon Elections 2009
  11. ^ International Foundation for Electoral Systems (9 November 2009). Lebanon's New Government (PDF) (Report). 
  12. ^ Worth, Robert F. (2009-11-10). "Impasse Over, Lebanon Forms Cabinet". The New York Times. Retrieved 2010-05-07. 
  13. ^ http://english.aljazeera.net/news/middleeast/2011/01/20111148327398443.html

External links[edit]