Sultopride

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Sultopride
Systematic (IUPAC) name
N-[(1-ethylpyrrolidin-2-yl)methyl]-5-ethylsulfonyl-2-methoxy-benzamide
Clinical data
AHFS/Drugs.com International Drug Names
Pregnancy cat.  ?
Legal status Prescription only
Routes Oral, IM
Pharmacokinetic data
Half-life 3–5 hours
Identifiers
CAS number 53583-79-2 N
ATC code N05AL02
PubChem CID 5357
ChemSpider 5164 YesY
UNII AA0G3TW31W YesY
KEGG D08549 YesY
ChEMBL CHEMBL277945 YesY
Chemical data
Formula C17H26N2O4S 
Mol. mass 354.46 g/mol
 N (what is this?)  (verify)

Sultopride (Barnetil, Barnotil, Topral) is an atypical antipsychotic of the benzamide chemical class used in Europe, Japan, and Hong Kong for the treatment of schizophrenia.[1][2][3] It was launched by Sanofi-Aventis in 1976.[1] Sultopride acts as a selective D2 and D3 receptor antagonist.[4] It has also been shown to have clinically relevant affinity for the GHB receptor as well, a property it shares in common with amisulpride and sulpiride.[5]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b José Miguel Vela; Helmut Buschmann; Jörg Holenz; Antonio Párraga; Antoni Torrens (2007). Antidepressants, Antipsychotics, Anxiolytics: From Chemistry and Pharmacology to Clinical Application. Weinheim: Wiley-VCH. ISBN 3-527-31058-4. http://books.google.com/books?id=yXD4QA-Y_Z0C&lpg=PA537.
  2. ^ Swiss Pharmaceutical Society (2000). Index Nominum 2000: International Drug Directory (Book with CD-ROM). Boca Raton: Medpharm Scientific Publishers. ISBN 3-88763-075-0. http://books.google.com/?id=5GpcTQD_L2oC&lpg=PA1624&dq=sultopride&pg=PA983.
  3. ^ European Drug Index, 4th Edition. Boca Raton: CRC Press. 1998. ISBN 3-7692-2114-1. http://books.google.com/books?id=HiSdvzs2pPAC&lpg=PA136.
  4. ^ Burstein, E. S.; Ma, J; Wong, S; Gao, Y; Pham, E; Knapp, AE; Nash, NR; Olsson, R et al. (2005). "Intrinsic efficacy of antipsychotics at human D2, D3, and D4 dopamine receptors: identification of the clozapine metabolite N-desmethylclozapine as a D2/D3 partial agonist". The Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics 315 (3): 1278–87. doi:10.1124/jpet.105.092155. PMID 16135699.
  5. ^ Maitre M, Ratomponirina C, Gobaille S, Hodé Y, Hechler V (1994). "Displacement of [3H] gamma-hydroxybutyrate binding by benzamide neuroleptics and prochlorperazine but not by other antipsychotics". Eur J Pharmacol. 256 (2): 211–4. doi:10.1016/0014-2999(94)90248-8. PMID 7914168.