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Lillian Florence "Meena" Gunn (1886 – 1973), nee Meacham, was a British psychoanalyst, who trained with Sigmund Freud and Sándor Ferenczi. She practiced in England (where she worked with Anna Freud) and in the United States (where she specialied in schitzophrenia). She was married three times: first to the musician Herbert Hughes, with whom she had her first son, musician, music critic, and author Patrick "Spike" Hughes; then to Egyptologist Battiscombe Gunn, with whom she had her second son, physicist J. B. (Iain) Gunn, and finally to neurologist Alexander Grey Clarke. --- http://www.psychoanalytikerinnen.de/greatbritain_biographies.html#Gunn Women Psychoanalysts in Great Britain


Nicena [Meena?] Battiscombe Gunn was born Lillian Florence "Meena" Meacham in Maidstone, Kent. She grew up in a protestant family, the eldest of four children. Her youngest sister Gwendoline Emily Meacham, better known as Wendy Wood, was a famous campaigner for Scottish independence. Her father Charles Stephen Meacham was a chemist, her mother Florence Wood came from an old Scottish family. In 1894 the family moved to South Africa, where Charles Meacham took up a leading position in a brewery. In her late teens, Meena Meacham returned to London to study piano at the Royal Academy of Music. She became part of the circle around George Bernard Shaw and H. G. Wells and was a member of the Fabian Society. In 1907 she married the Irish musician Herbert Hughes (1882-1937), their son Patrick - later known as Spike Hughes - was born in 1908. After her divorce from Hughes in 1922, she married the Egyptologist Battiscombe George Gunn (1883-1950), who was a Curator and Professor in Cairo, Philadelphia and Oxford. (Fig.) In 1928 their son John Battiscombe Gunn was born, who later became a physicist. They divorced in the beginning of the 1940s. Meena Gunn married the neurologist and psychiatrist Alexander Grey Clarke, who died in 1944. Meena Battiscombe Gunn studied in Vienna and began her psychoanalytic training as a staff member of the Wiener Psychoanalytisches Ambulatorium in 1924. That same year she went to Budapest, presumably to continue her psychoanalytic training with Sándor Ferenczi. She attended the International Psychoanalytical Congress in Salzburg (1924) and in Bad Homburg (1925), but she did not join the British Psychoanalytical Society. She maintained a psychoanalytical practice on Harley Street in London, and after World War II she worked with Anna Freud. In the 1960s she went to the United States



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She was known, at various times, as Miss Meacham, Mrs. Hughes, Mrs. Gunn, Mrs Grey-Clarke, Dr. Gunn and Dr. Grey-Clarke, even though she had neither the academic not medical credentias to be called Dr. Both her second husband and her second son were also frequently called "Dr. Gunn" even though they were not Doctors. The website "Women Psychoanalysts in Great Britain" [1] calls her "Nicena Battiscombe Gunn".

She has been described as bony and nervy, the model of a Fabian New Woman, intellectually advnturous, and sexually liberated [2] [3]. Her son Patrick described her as "a woman of enormous vitality, adventurousness and courage" [4].

Early life[edit]

Lillian Florence Meacham was born on the grounds of Fremlin's brewery (now Fremlin Walk) in Maidstone, Kent, where her father was the brewery chemist. Her father Charles Stephen Meacham, from Lichfield, Staffordshire had trained as a brewery chemist at Lichfieldd Brewery, without any academic training, and became a fellow of the Chemical Society. Her mother, Florence Peploe Wood, the daughter of sculptor Samuel Peploe Wood, was from Little Haywood, also in Staffordshire. Both Charles and Florence were serious amateur artists.

Lillian was the eldest of four children. The second was Hilda (also known as Bell), who married C.W. (Billy) Barnish, a Lever Brothers executive, but died in the esarly 20s. The third child was Alan, who emigrated to Australia. The youngest was Wendy Wood,a famous campaigner for Scottish independence. Her real name was Gwendoline Emily Meacham, but she adopted her mother's maiden name. Wendy frequenty claimed to have a Scottish grandmother, but there is no evidence of this. The cloest Scottish connection is by marriage: Florence's elderly aunt, Alethea Wood, married a Scotsman, Alexander Ross, and moved to Scotlnd with him when he retired.

As a child Lillian, with bright blond plaits, was thought to resemble Princess (later Queen) Wilhelmina of the Netherlands. Alfred Richard Oragegave her the nickname "Meena" as a result[4], and that was the name she was known by for the rest of her life.

In 1894 the family moved to South Africa, where Charles Meacham took up the position of breewery chemist and brewery manager Ohlsson's Brewery in Cape Town.


[4] [5]

[6]

[7]

[1]

Careers[edit]

Psychoanalist[edit]

Concert Pianist[edit]

Sculptor and Potter[edit]

Terracottta at Victoria and Albert 609A TABLET in terra-cotta. Designed and executed by Meena Gunn. Ehibited by the artist. Publications is http://books.google.com/books?id=HmLrAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA55&lpg=PA55&dq=%22meena+gunn%22&source=bl&ots=_7BUlhSANZ&sig=ulqo8dO9ynrJKyGVoHHcDpHUgxM&hl=en&sa=X&ei=-MpsUeXqMvC50AG_o4GgCg&ved=0CE4Q6AEwBg#v=onepage&q=%22meena%20gunn%22&f=false

SUPPLEMENT TO CATALOGUE OF WAR MEMORIALS EXHIBITION. LIST OF ADDITIONS ... WEST HALL

Title of book is Notes on Priting adn Bookbinding:mA Guide to the Exhibition of Tools and Materials Used in the Processes by ST Prideaux first pringted 1921

Which i odd because whe ws not divorced from Hughes until 1922.

Dog breeding and showing[edit]

Personal life[edit]

She was born Lillian Meacham, in Maidstone, Kent, but had spent most of her teeange years in Cape Town, South Africa, where her father, C.S. Meacham, was brewery manager and corporate chemist for Ohlsson's Brewery.[4] She was given the nickname Meena by Orage, who said that her childhood blond plaits reminded him of Princess Wilhelmina. In her late teens, she returned to London to study piano at the Royal Academy of Music. Her younger sister was Gwendoline Meacham, who became a Scots Nationalist, and changed her name to Wendy Wood.

In addition to playing piano, for which she won 2 gold medals and then stopped playing, she became part of the circle around G. B. Shaw and H. G. Wells. She was a member of the Fabian Society and attended Theosophy lectures. In 1907, not long before her marriage to Hughes, she had a brief affair with the sculptor, printmaker and typographer Eric Gill, with whom both she and Jack were lifelong friends.[8] Jack rented a cottage in Ditchling, where Gill was located, in the summer of 1919, and Jack, Meena and Pat all stayed there.[4]

In 1915, in the midst of World War I, Meena was in Florence, Italy, visiting another suitor, a "rich American". Jack escorted her seven year old son, Patrick Hughes (later Spike Hughes) from London to Florence, and then returned. In his autobiography, "Opening Bars", Pat describes his part in her decision to return to England and marry Jack.[4] Her divorce from Herbert Hughes, however, was not finalized until 1922.[9]

During the early 1920s, while Jack was working in Egypt during the season, Meena spent quite a lot of time in central Europe, and Jack spent his summers there. In 1924, Meena studied psychoanalysis with Sigmund Freud in Vienna, and Sándor Ferenczi in Budapest. During this time, Jack was asked to visit Freud and look at his Egyptian antiquities. He never said anything to Freud, but he was convinced that nearly all of them were fakes.[5] Meena was a practicing psychoanalyst for the following 45 years, into her 80s. While Jack was Professor of Egyptology at Oxford, Meena maintained a psychoanalytical practice on Harley Street in London. After World War II she worked closely with Anna Freud, and in the 1960s she practiced in the U.S.

After she completed her psychoanalytic training, Meena accompanied Jack while he was working in Egypt, and in 1928, their son J. B. Gunn, known as Iain, (later a physicist) was born in Cairo.

In 1940, Meena and Jack were divorced, as Meena wanted to marry Alex Grey-Clarke, a young Harley Street doctor.


[2]


First Marriage[edit]

[3]


Second Marraige[edit]

Third Marriage[edit]

Widowhood[edit]

Notes[edit]


References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Women Psychoanalysts in Great Britain". Retrieved 11 April 2013. 
  2. ^ a b MacCarthy, Fiona (1989), Eric Gill, Faber & Faber, ISBN 0-571-14302-4 
  3. ^ a b Hughes, Angela (tbd), Chelsea Footsteps, tbd: Faber & Faber, ISBN tbd Check |isbn= value (help) 
  4. ^ a b c d e f Hughes, Spike (1946), Opening Bars - Beginning an Autobiography, London: Pilot Press 
  5. ^ a b Hughes, Spike (1951), Second Movement - Continuing the Autobiography, London: Museum Press 
  6. ^ Wood, Wendy (1938), I Like Life, Edinburgh, London: The Moray Press 
  7. ^ Wood, Wendy (1970), Yours sincerely for Scotland, London: Barker, ISBN 0-213-00046-6 
  8. ^ Cite error: The named reference Gill was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  9. ^ Cite error: The named reference chelsea was invoked but never defined (see the help page).






http://www.psychoanalytikerinnen.de/greatbritain_biographies.html#Gunn


Lillian Florence "Meena" Battiscombe Gunn was born into a protestant family in Maidstone, Kent. She was one of three daughters, her younger sister Gwendoline Emily Meacham, better known as Wendy Wood, was a famous campaigner for Scottish independence. Her father Charles Stephen Meacham was a chemist, her mother Florence Wood came from an old Scottish family. In 1894 the family moved to South Africa, where Charles Meacham took up a leading position in a brewery.

In her late teens, Meena Meacham returned to London to study piano at the Royal Academy of Music. She became part of the circle around George Bernard Shaw and H. G. Wells and was a member of the Fabian Society. In 1907 she married the Irish musician Herbert Hughes (1882-1937), their son Patrick - later known as Spike Hughes - was born in 1908. After her divorce from Hughes in 1922, she married the Egyptologist Battiscombe George Gunn (1883-1950), who was a Curator and Professor in Cairo, Philadelphia and Oxford. In 1928 their son John Battiscombe Gunn was born, who later became a physicist. (Fig.) They divorced in the beginning of the 1940s.
Nicena Battiscombe Gunn studied in Vienna and began her psychoanalytic training as a staff member of the Wiener Psychoanalytisches Ambulatorium in 1924. That same year she went to Budapest, presumably to continue her psychoanalytic training with Sándor Ferenczi. She attended the International Psychoanalytical Congress in Salzburg (1924) and in Bad Homburg (1925), but she did not join the British Psychoanalytical Society. She maintained a psychoanalytical practice on Harley Street in London, and after World War II she worked with Anna Freud. In the 1960s she went to the United States.

REFERENCES Addison, Rosemary: Designing Woman. textualities 2005 (2008-04-07)

Hughes, Patrick C.: Opening Bars. Beginning an Autobiography. London 1946
Hughes, Patrick C.: Second Movement. Continuing the Autobiography. London 1951
Lück, Helmut E., und Elke Mühlleitner (Hg.): Psychoanalytiker in der Karikatur. München 1993
Simpson, R. S.: Gunn, Battiscombe George (1883-1950). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Bd. 24. Oxford, New York 2004, 237f
Simpson, R. S.: Gunn, Battiscombe George (1883-1950). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Bd. 24. Oxford, New York 2004, 237f
Wikipedia: Wendy Wood; Battiscombe Gunn; Spike Hughes; J. B. Gunn (2012-02-09)

FIG.: Olga Székely-Kovács (1924)